3 pills, triple therapy regimens

Triple Therapy: Proven Results for Patients Living with HIV

The DHHS Guidelines recommend the use of a complete triple therapy based on a dual NRTI plus an INSTI for treatment initiation.1

3 pill components, Current standard of care

Today's regimens offer sustained virologic efficacy, better tolerability and toxicity profiles, and relative ease of use.1

TREATMENT

Treatment history infographic desktop Treatment history infographic mobile

Download the complete infographic, HIV Treatment Then and Now: Strides in HIV Therapy, to see how best practices have changed along with development of new drug regimens.

Patient considerations file

PATIENT CONSIDERATIONS WHEN SELECTING A THERAPY

Potential side effects and regimen convenience are important factors when selecting a regimen.1 Consider a simplified regimen to help patients achieve their treatment goals.

According to the DHHS Guidelines, a regimen that includes all 3 components that is taken one time a day is easier for patients to use.1 Additionally, individualized care involves specific treatment considerations for a number of special patient populations and clinical scenarios. These include1:

  • Results of pretreatment genotypic drug-resistance testing
  • From acute infection to established
  • High viral load and low CD4 count
  • Initiating treatment or switching therapy
  • Various health needs: pregnancy, coinfection, comorbidities, and interactions with concomitant medications

Consider a complete triple therapy for patients living with HIV

REFERENCES:

  1. US Department of Health and Human Services. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in adults and adolescents living with HIV. https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/adultandadolescentgl.pdf. Updated May 30, 2018. Accessed June 4, 2018.
  2. Chesney MA, Farmer P, Leandre F, Malow R, Starace F. Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In: Sabaté E, ed. Adherence to Long-Term Therapies. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2003:95-106.
  3. US Department of Health and Human Services. A timeline of HIV/AIDS. https://www.hiv.gov/sites/default/files/aidsgov-timeline.pdf. Accessed June 5, 2018.
  4. US Department of Health and Human Services. FDA approval of HIV medicines. https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/understanding-hiv-aids/infographics/25/fda-approval-of-hiv-medicines. Accessed June 5, 2018.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Report of the NIH panel to define principles of therapy of HIV infection and guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-infected adults and adolescents. In: MMWR (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report). Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 1998. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/rr4705.pdf. Published April 24, 1998. Accessed June 5, 2018.
  6. US Department of Health and Human Services. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescents. December 1, 2009; 1-161. https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/adultandadolescentgl001561.pdf. Published December 1, 2009. Accessed June 5, 2018.